The History of Screens

Isn’t it nice that we can sit in our screened in porch and enjoy a cup of coffee during the morning without bees, wasps and critters bothering us? Screens are an unsung hero. To those reading this, we’ve always had them, so we don’t appreciate them as much as we should. It wasn’t too long ago that windows and doors didn’t have screening on them. The windows were either open or closed, which affected the view, ventilation, and the lack of insect, animal, and debris control.

The first wire screens were recorded in 1825 as “woven wire” screens. From that point on, “woven wire window” screens caught on. In the 1840’s Gilbert and Bennett Manufacturing invented wire mesh window screens. The first patent for screens was in 1868 by Bayley and McCluskey to be used on railcars to provide ventilation while protecting passengers from the dust and sparks of the running train. Window screens then evolved into preventing insects from entering residential homes through windows, which, over time, reduced the number of parasitic diseases in the United States. Most operable windows in the USA and Canada have window screens on them nowadays.

It has been less than 100 years since the window screen came into existence. Since then, we have SuperScreens which prevent tearing, punctures and mildew growth. We also have screens that provide UV protection, screens that display an image like a painting, bug free screens that keep out even the teeny tiny No-see-ums, and motorized screens. Our porches and lanai’s have screening so sunny days can be enjoyed without animals and insects invading our space. It also helps to keep children and pets inside the enclosed space, providing a safety feature. Our doors have screens on them now too. Front doors, back doors, sliding glass doors and even garage doors all are now available with various types of screens.

If you are looking for a superior screening company, please contact East Coast Electric Screening at flascreens.com or give us a call at 561-746-2622